Christmas in Canada, 1941

As part of their efforts to help POWs interned in Canada, the War Prisoners’ Aid of the YMCA printed and distributed thousands of Christmas cards each year for POWs and internees in the country. Calls for art submissions were issued to internment camps and POW artists submitted sketches, paintings, and linocuts in the chance ofContinue reading “Christmas in Canada, 1941”

POWs and “the good ol’ hockey game”

On first glance, it may seem a simple photo of a hockey game and soldiers looking on. But on a closer look, something stands out – the soldiers are not Canadian. They are German. This picture, which I was very pleased to add to my collection, is a relatively rare photo of German POWs atContinue reading “POWs and “the good ol’ hockey game””

Christmas at Camp 70 – Fredericton

The sketch above was submitted to War Prisoners’ Aid for consideration of being printed as one of the annual Christmas cards produced by the organization and distributed to PoWs in Canada. The artist, Rudi Boege, was a civilian internee at Camp 70 (Fredericton, NB) and, as the spokesman described, one of the most gifted artistsContinue reading “Christmas at Camp 70 – Fredericton”

Sports behind Barbed Wire

Life behind barbed wire was generally monotonous and strictly regulated and for those spending upwards of five years in internment camps were liable to suffer significant mental strain. In an attempt to both prevent this and to break-up their daily routine, among the many activities organized by PoWs were sporting events. A variety of teamsContinue reading “Sports behind Barbed Wire”

Prisoner of War Mail and the YMCA – Part II of PoW Mail

Updated translations August 5, 2014 and November 29, 2016 – Thanks to G√ľnther and Joel for their help! In my last post I introduced the basics of Prisoner of War mail in Canada during the Second World War. Today, I’m going to continue this by showing another type of postcard. In the early years ofContinue reading “Prisoner of War Mail and the YMCA – Part II of PoW Mail”

Mother’s Day – 1918

I haven’t been able to do any further research but apparently the YMCA produced stationery specifically for soldiers writing home for Mother’s Day. I can’t imagine the YMCA thought that this would be used by a Canadian Forestry Corps company to record some productions statistics but it looks like they used anything on hand. Anyways,Continue reading “Mother’s Day – 1918”