Exploring and Sharing the Past with iGIS

This post is long overdue but better late than never! About a year-and-a-half ago, I started using iGIS, an iOS app that allows you to visualize geospatial data on your mobile device. My Professor, Josh MacFadyen, had demonstrated the possibilities of this app in our digital history class and I was eager to find waysContinue reading “Exploring and Sharing the Past with iGIS”

Camp 31 – Fort Henry: Then and Now

Of all twenty-eight-or-so internment camps in Canada during the Second World War, I can only think of five that have either changed relatively little or haven’t been completely destroyed (at least from the external appearance) in the last seventy years. Among these few is Camp 31 (originally Camp F) at Fort Henry in Kingston, Ontario.Continue reading “Camp 31 – Fort Henry: Then and Now”

An Athlete: Leutnant Hilmar Schmidt

Continuing my last post’s brief discussion of sports in PoW camps in Canada, today’s post showcases a few pieces in my collection relating to the sporting achievements of one German officer in Camp 30. Camp 30, located in Bowmanville, Ontario, was among the many camps to have organized sporting events. The camp was built aroundContinue reading “An Athlete: Leutnant Hilmar Schmidt”

Following In Their Footsteps

For my 50th post and my one-year anniversary on WordPress, I’d like to share what I’ve been up to these last few weeks. Two years ago, I was forwarded an email from someone in Germany whose father had spent time in Canada during the Second World War as a prisoner of war. Lutz, the senderContinue reading “Following In Their Footsteps”

Postcard from Malte Sacolowsky, U-501

Last week I posted about “Real Photo” picture postcards sent home by PoWs interned in Canada. Today, I’d like to focus on one of those postcards and share a little more about one of the men featured in it. In the seventy years that have passed since these postcards were mailed, the provenance of manyContinue reading “Postcard from Malte Sacolowsky, U-501”

Juno Beach: Then and Now

To mark the 70th Anniversary of the D-Day landings, here is one of the projects I have been working on. Earlier in the year, the Laurier Military History Archive released thousands of aerial photographs taken during the Second World War. Among the collection was a number of photos taking during reconnaissance missions leading up toContinue reading “Juno Beach: Then and Now”

Mother’s Day – 1918

I haven’t been able to do any further research but apparently the YMCA produced stationery specifically for soldiers writing home for Mother’s Day. I can’t imagine the YMCA thought that this would be used by a Canadian Forestry Corps company to record some productions statistics but it looks like they used anything on hand. Anyways,Continue reading “Mother’s Day – 1918”

Interactive Exhibit – Video

Bit of a delay since my last post, my apologies! As I get back into the swing of things, I hope my posts become a bit more regular. Just a quick post today – a short video showing off my project for the Interactive Exhibit Design. Fellow PhD Candidate Steve Marti recorded and produced aContinue reading “Interactive Exhibit – Video”

Pte. Ernest Albert Proven, 1895-1917

Today marks the 97th anniversary of the Canadian assault on Vimy Ridge. Among the thousands of Canadian soldiers who went “over-the-top” that fateful morning were two of my great-great uncles, Harry and Ernest Proven. While Harry survived the attack (read more about him here), his younger brother was not so lucky. On December 13, 1895,Continue reading “Pte. Ernest Albert Proven, 1895-1917”

Fourth Symposium of Environmental Historians of Southern Ontario

I am happy to say that I will be presenting at the Fourth Symposium of Environmental Historians of Southern Ontario this Saturday (March 22, 2014). The University of Toronto, with support from NiCHE, is hosting the event which will be focusing on energy and forestry. I will be presenting some of my research about PoWsContinue reading “Fourth Symposium of Environmental Historians of Southern Ontario”